How to Know If Your Garbage Disposal is Broken For Good

Garbage disposals have grown to be a great benefit in our modern day homes. Housed beneath our sinks, they make our lives life easier by eating our leftovers and getting rid of other unwanted food products we no longer have a use for.

Often, foreign objects will sneak into the disposal or too much food being inserted into it can cause the entire thing to become clogged.

But what do you do when your disposal isn’t wanting to work for you at all?

In this blog post, I would like to share some of the ways you can tell if your garbage disposal is broken before you decide to call a professional appliance repair technician or get a new one once and for all.

Hint #1: Garbage Disposal Won’t Turn On At All

When you flip the switch on your garbage disposal and nothing happens, there is more than likely an electrical problem. This could possibly mean that an attempt to put too much down the disposal could have caused it to overload and short out the circuits.

If resetting the circuits and trying the rest button on the disposal don’t work then there’s the unfortunate chance that it is seriously broken.

Hint #2: Disposal Comes On But Doesn’t Devour Food

When you can get your disposal to turn on but not take care of the food you are putting into it, there’s a good chance that the flywheel is stuck on something or the motor has locked up. This problem can also cause the circuit to overload and the disposal to turn off, which can cause drastic damage if the unit is left on during the process.

Hint #3: The Disposal is Making Humming Noises

There are times when you may turn on your disposal and all you get is a humming sound. Often times, tiny products can get stuck in, under, or near the flywheel of the disposal and in a difficult place to remove.

The most important thing to remember in this situation is to never leave the unit on for more than ten seconds so you don’t burn out the motor. Refer to the video below for more detailed instructions for removing debris from around your flywheel, or see this article.

 
 

How to Fix a Leaking Water Heater

 Water heater leaks shouldn’t be taken lightly, and should be assessed as quickly as possible. Even the smallest leak can cause mold or mildew damage, which can be quite hazardous to your health. Even the EPA suggests that any leaks that could lead to mold damage should be treated ASAP to prevent the risk of developing any major health problems.

On top of everything else, water heaters aren’t cheap to replace, so identifying what could be causing a leak is imperative to making sure you can fix the one you have now. In this article, I would like to talk about the ways to determine what could be causing a leak, so you can get the bottom of things and get the show back on the road again.

1.) Find the Leak, Keeping Your Safety in Mind

Keep in mind that a leaking water heater around electricity can pose a dangerous situation. For optimal safety, turn off the electricity to the water heater on your circuit breaker, and turn off the water while you are at it.

The next step includes draining your water heater of all it’s water. Use a bucket or similar object to empty the water from the hot water tap, to ensure that you won’t get scalded during the fixing process.

2.) Identify the Problem Causing the Leak

Water heater leaks can be caused by many different problems, but some of the most common include:

#1. Heating Element Leak – This is the last problem you want to have because it unfortunately means you will need a new unit completely, as the heating element is one of the most important and it’s the one not working.

#2. Plumbing Connection Leak – By plumbing connection, I mean the place on your water heater where your inlet and outlet pipes meet the unit itself. These components being lose can cause a leak, and simply tightening or replacing them can fix the problem all together.

#3. Storage Tank Leaking – Storage tank leaking can cause corrosion, which can mean a new unit all together. Check the entire unit for holes of all sizes and if you come across any at all, you unfortunately will be looking into a new unit.

#4. Excessive Pressure or Overheating – Excessive pressure from your unit can cause a leak, which can easily be addressed by lowering the temperature on your unit.

#5. Fault in Pressure or Temperature Relief Valve – A fault in pressure could be present thanks to a presence of debris, which can easily be cleaned out. The clogged debris may be causing a build up of pressure. Simply place a bucket underneath the overflow pipe and open up the T & P pipe to catch the debris.

3.) Complete Your Inspection Before Replacing

This may seem like common sense, but it’s best to make sure you have performed a thorough assessment before deciding that you need a new water heater.

If you aren’t 100% sure about your assessment, give a professional a call, as they may be your best option for saving money. After all, water heaters are expensive, and hiring a plumbing professional could actually end up saving you money in the end.

 

image credit: a1plumberinc.com